Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Oatmeal Raisin CookiesMy oldest son, the Musician,  loves to bake cookies.  Snickerdoodles have become his specialty.  When he was in high school, he’d bake up a batch to take to school as often as I’d let him into the kitchen.  Everyone in school started to recognize my round, blue topped Tupperware container that he carried around filled with cookies.  During his senior year, one of his teachers made the statement that her Oatmeal Raisin Cookies were better than any other oatmeal cookie out there.  The gauntlet was thrown and my son had to accept the challenge.Oatmeal Raisin CookiesNow, I am just going to throw this out there, but there is a difference between snickerdoodles and oatmeal cookies.  Okay, there are a lot of differences: texture, appearance, flavor.  My son had not made oatmeal cookies, but because of his earlier success, he was sure he could beat her.  Long story short, the class voted the teacher’s cookies the winner.  As a consolation prize, she gave The Musician the recipe.  As a penalty from The Musician’s mama, I am giving the whole world the recipe.  I have no idea where she got it, but it is a pretty good recipe.Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Day Three of Cookie Week continues with these other tantalizing cookies:

 

And once again, if you happened to miss the giveaway, please enter HERE.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 1½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1¼ cup butter, room temperature
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 eggs
  • 1½ cup flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 3 cups quick oats
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Beat sugars and butter until fluffy.
  3. Add vanilla and eggs.
  4. Combine flour, soda, cinnamon and salt in a small bowl.
  5. Add to sugar mixture, mixing well.
  6. Stir in oats, raisins and nuts.
  7. Drop by rounded teaspoonful onto greased or parchment lined baking sheets.
  8. Bake 375 for 7-20 minutes or until edges are golden brown.
  9. Cool 2 minutes, remove to wire racks to finish cooling.

 

 

16 thoughts on “Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

  1. I’m more of a chocolate chip oatmeal cookie girl, but these sound quite delicious anyways… maybe I’ll set aside my dislike of raisins in cookies for a moment and give these a try, seeing as they’re the best oatmeal cookie out there and all that. :)

  2. I adore oatmeal cookies…and I’ll have to add this winning recipe to my repertoire! Like Isabelle, I will have to swap out the raisins for chocolate chips :)

  3. When I talk about cookies I get more excited about oatmeal cookies than snickerdoodles, but when faced with real cookies I would say that I prefer snickerdoodles. The truth is, I love all cookies and I am very curious to try this recipe! Maybe with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. :-)

  4. YAY for kids that like to bake! Especially when in high school!! The cookies look wonderful…I’m a huge fan of raisins and these cookies are in my top 5 faves. :)

    1. I think they are waning in popularity, actually. Gooey chocolate and caramel or frosted cookies have taken the lead. My kids like them, but they’d much rather eat others.

  5. I made these and they are delicious. However, they turned out REALLY big. They just kept speading out and were thin on the outside and thicker in the middle. Any suggestions on how to keep them from spreading out so much?

    1. Hi – I think you could any of the following things: 1. chill the dough before baking 2. make sure you don’t cream the butter and sugars more than 30 seconds 3. make sure you use high gluten flour such as King Arthur, White Lily or any local brand that is 100% wheat (not barley flour mixed in). Any of them should help the cookies not spread as much. I am glad you liked them!!

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